Skating On Extremely Thin Ice Does Not Sound Like Anything We’ve Heard Before

Owls hooting? Dogs barking? Aliens shooting ray-guns? We’re really not sure how to describe the noise produced by 45-millimeter pond ice when a daredevil decides to skate on it.

 

 

The idiom “skate on thin ice” usually means: danger—stop what you’re doing, or else. However, skating on thin, black ice is exactly what Swedish ice skating enthusiasts Henrik Trygg and Mårten Ajne love to do.

 

We're really not sure how to describe the noise produced by 45-millimeter pond ice when a daredevil decides to skate on it.

 

To hit the ice when it has just begun to freeze, in its most pristine, dangerously thin state, is the ultimate thrill in “wild ice skating,” or “Nordic skating.” It’s the “holy grail,” says Trygg.

A photographer and filmmaker based in Stockholm, Trygg has made an art of capturing both the clear, black appearance of the ice, and the laser-like symphony of sounds created when an ice skater’s bodyweight passes over it.

 

Skating On Extremely Thin Ice Does Not Sound Like Anything We've Heard Before

 

For the video, Trygg filmed Ajne skating on 45-millimeter-thick ice on Lissma Kvarnsjö, a lake outside Stockholm, Sweden.

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